Camera body recommendations

Discussion in 'Canon EOS Digital SLRs' started by Sonesta Smith, Jun 30, 2019.

  1. Sonesta Smith

    Sonesta Smith New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2019
    Messages:
    1
    Equipment:
    10D; 60D; 22-55mm; 50mm 1.8; 75-300mm
    I'm a natural light family/portrait photographer. Due to family issue over the past 10 years, I have not been able to run my own business. Thankfully I have been able to stay in the game, though, due to working as a second shooter in my friend's wedding business. I'm getting back into the game, updating my equipment. What would be the best camera body to get?
     

  2. rayallen

    rayallen Active Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2017
    Messages:
    678
    Location:
    Forresters Beach, Central Coast, NSW, Australia.
    Equipment:
    Canon 1Ds, Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM, Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 II, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8, Canon EF 75-300mm 1:4-5.6 III, Canon 20D, Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 II IS STM. Pentax K-3, Pentax K10D, and lots more Pentax gear.
    If you do family/portraits then maybe a 5D IV would be a good choice. It looks like you have EF lenses that will mount onto it.
     
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  3. Craig Sherriff

    Craig Sherriff Active Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2017
    Messages:
    415
    Location:
    Tasmania, Australia
    Equipment:
    60D, 10D, 50D 1dmark3, T70, AV1, lenses ranging from 28mm to 600 mm, Mamaya C3 and 3 lens sets, Pentax MG and various lenses
    My advice is to make sure you have two cameras on hand. Camera fails do occur so a back up one will be needed.
    As for which type, this will come down to personal choice and cost. I believe the best people to get advice from are those people who are successful in the business, see what they use. I do not do weddings but as a suggestion there would be two canons. as Ray suggested the 5D mark4 or 80D, hope all goes well.
     
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  4. GDN

    GDN Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2018
    Messages:
    394
    Location:
    South Island, NZ
    Equipment:
    A little Canon stuff
    I would have a good look at the EOS R mirrorless body. A new mount and some nice new lenses.

    Gary
     
  5. johnsey

    johnsey Site Moderator Staff Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2017
    Messages:
    336
    Location:
    Fargo, ND
    Equipment:
    5dMk2, 20D, 70-200 2.8 L IS, 100mm 2.8 Macro USM, 50m 1.4, 85mm 1.8, 17-40mm 4.0 L, Rokinon 14mm 2.8; Pixma Pro-100
    So my suggestion is going to be the dark horse here for a few reasons. You have a 60d which is a very capable camera (18mp), sure an 80d would be an upgrade in the same advanced armature level of bodies. But I'm going to look at this from the perpective of hiring someone based on what I heard...

    The 60d in someones kit wouldn't worry me from a hiring perspective, the fact that they own 200 bucks in glass would tell me that they aren't very experienced. You would get a lot more mileage upgrading your lenses in my opinion, all of your lenses are consumer level glass. Many people like the 24-105L for weddings, but it does have a little weight to it. I opted for a 17-40L and a number of primes instead to cover that range of millimeters. I think you will find the 50 1.4 to be a vastly superior lens to you nifty 50 1.8. I think an upgraded 50 and 85 mm would do well in a kit for you if your focus is portraiture.

    My second suggestion would be learn to use flash, I always cringe when I hear natural light. As 9 out of 10 times that means they don't have/can't shoot flash if it is needed. Outdoors on location it is really important for fill flash so that you don't have harsh shadows. And if you want to step it up an get creative, look up The Strobist on the internet, Joe McNalley will open your eyes to how easy off camera flash can be. I'm not trying to lecture honestly I swear, in fact 95% of what i shoot is done without flash and possibly with filters when appropriate. Its important to send the message that natural light is choice when it suits the environment, not a crutch.

    So there it is my suggestion for on location portraiture, upgraded prime lenses , maybe a higher end short zoom for the group shots you might have to take. Grab a few strobes and get your fill flash and off camera flash game going. Once you start making some good money at weddings you can upgrade the body and turn that 60d into a backup body. By then the 90d will be out but you may want to consider a 6d or 5d body at that point.
     
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  6. Craig Sherriff

    Craig Sherriff Active Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2017
    Messages:
    415
    Location:
    Tasmania, Australia
    Equipment:
    60D, 10D, 50D 1dmark3, T70, AV1, lenses ranging from 28mm to 600 mm, Mamaya C3 and 3 lens sets, Pentax MG and various lenses
    I agree what johnsey has said, I use my 60D as my primary camera. I purchased it off or a Wedding photographer who had 2 of them, he sold the one I purchased to finance the purchase of a camera more suited to videoing . I suggest that if you get a new camera, learn how it functions from back to front before you use on a wedding shoot, there is nothing more embarrassing than having the camera fail and not being able to correct the fault when on a job. Once you have missed the opportunity to take a shot you can not get it back.
     
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  7. Ajay

    Ajay New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Equipment:
    Canon 1DX Mark II, 5DSR, 5D IV, EOS R
    My advice would be to pick up a 5D4 or EOS R. You can’t go wrong with these choices and would also be future proof for few years
     

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