Changing Behaviour

Discussion in 'Post Your Photos' started by Craig Sherriff, Nov 15, 2020.

  1. Craig Sherriff

    Craig Sherriff Well-Known Member Site Supporter

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    I have put this image up, not so much for the quality of the image but he unusual behavior shown by the bird. This is a Black Duck, a wild bird, not a domesticated one, and at the back of this fence is a grassed reserve and beside it a creek which I have seen this one and other wild duck inhabiting. This is the first time I have seen a wild duck perch on a fence and wait for the occupants of the house to put food out for it Wild Black Duck sitting on fence.jpg .
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2020
    Paul F and rayallen like this.

  2. Paul F

    Paul F Member

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    I have always been an outdoors type, with a keen interest in our native fauna, and the increasing variety of "wild" birds (and to a lesser extent, animals) that can now be seen regularly coming into gardens in the UK, even in the most built up areas is amazing to see. I am seeing birds in and around my own town now that previously I would have had to drive many miles out into the countryside to see thirty years ago. I used to put it down to the steady urbanisation and lack of habitat in the UK in general, but I don't think this is the case anymore, as things aren't changing quick enough here. It looks to me like they are just learning to fear us less, and make more of the resources available to them?
    I haven't had a duck in my yard yet though! :confused:

    That's probably enough of that from me on a photography forum though. :oops:
     
  3. Craig Sherriff

    Craig Sherriff Well-Known Member Site Supporter

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    I disagree a bit about it not belonging as it is a knowledge of the wilderness and it's wildlife, which aids us in our photography and the interaction between wildlife and urbanization.
    In Tasmania, where I live, we have Wallabies ( a smaller cousin to the Kangaroo) Possums and various other wildlife, bird life and reptiles ( we have 3 varieties of snake and all are poisonous) most of our urbanized areas are near or amongst wilderness areas, I do not have to go far to photograph such images.
     
  4. Caladina

    Caladina Active Member

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    "Darlin, whats for Dinner?"
    "hold on i'll see whats on the fence"
     
  5. KiloHotelphoto

    KiloHotelphoto Member Site Supporter

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    My parents get mallard ducks in their backyard. Ther'er a few pools in the neighborhood but no bodies of water, this pair of mallards has learned my parents put bird food out in feeders and it spills onto the ground for a quick snack for them. Every afternoon, early evening in the summer they show up been doing it for years.
     

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