Question: How to enlarge a picture without loosing quality?

Discussion in 'Post Processing, Printing, and Scanning' started by Spamski, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. Spamski

    Spamski New Member Site Supporter

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    Equipment:
    Canon XSI
    I took a Picture with my Canon XSI of the Golden Gate Bridge, but when I went to go have it enlarged, it looked horrible! How can I fix this?!

    Thank you!
     

  2. Phil

    Phil Administrator Staff Member Site Supporter

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    How big did you try to enlarge the picture?
     
  3. johnsey

    johnsey Moderator Staff Member Site Supporter

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    The answer would depend on several factors.

    Did you capture the image at the full 12 megapixels? How large did you try to print it? You should have been able to print a a 8x10 or 16x20 without too much trouble at that resolution. If you exported a smaller jpg and went to print it at a store I can see how that may have been problematic. What was you process for editing, export, printing?


    The image is going top have a set number of pixels, the print size and DPI are directly in correlation.
    For instance 12.1 megapixels is 4256 x 2848 pixels or at 300DPI resolution 9.5x 14.2 inches. You can resize it in the image editor to be other sizes, if you retain the pixels a 14 x 21 inch resize would be about 200 DPI. So there will be less pixels the larger you go.
     
  4. BBzone28

    BBzone28 Member

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    Back in the early days of DSLRs with small sensors, the Sports Photography group I worked with would get amazingly nice quality poster sized prints from 3Mpxl images from a local camera shop that used a program called Real Fractals that heavily processed the image before printing it.
     
  5. dmr

    dmr Member Site Supporter

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    If that was Genuine Fractals, I tried the demo version and thought it was awful! I've had better luck just resizing up slightly with Photoshop or Gimp.
     
  6. BBzone28

    BBzone28 Member

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    I think you're right, it was probably Genuine Fractals. I'm guessing the guys at the camera shop knew the best way to optimize it for their printer to get great results because I saw something like a 16x24 poster that was amazingly good for being a 3 Mpxl image. :)
     
  7. dmr

    dmr Member Site Supporter

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    One of my carry-everywhere cameras is an old hand-me-down Kodak DX4530 which is 5 megapixels. I was able to do a fairly decent 13x19 print from it by just sizing it properly in Gimp and feeding it to the printer in the exact resolutions and dimensions I wanted.

    I've found that one trick to getting good larger prints is to size things EXACTLY to the print size wanted, exact dimensions at 300ppi.
     
  8. JimmyDranox

    JimmyDranox Member Site Supporter

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    Canon 60D, Canon EF-S 18-135 IS STM, Sigma 17-50/2.8 OS HSM, Tamron 70-200/2.8
    You can try with On1 Resize 10.5. I didn't used it, but you can download a trial, and see the result.

    https://www.on1.com/products/resize10/

    What I use, but only for enlargements not bigger than 200-250% is the program I use for basic procesing and viewing, Faststone. Is fast and FREE.
     

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