Lens question

Discussion in 'Canon Lens Discussion' started by JRS950, Dec 1, 2019.

  1. JRS950

    JRS950 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2019
    Messages:
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    Location:
    On the road full time in the USA
    Equipment:
    EOS Rebel T6S
    EF-S 18-135; EF-S 55-250
    Speedlite 470EX-AI
    Okay, I'm just a guy that like to take decent photos. Average skill level, just getting into DSLR cameras after many years away from film cameras. I'd like to buy a 50mm lens for my EOS Rebel T6s. The f1.2 lens are out of my price range so that leaves the f1.4 and the f1.8. My question what difference in real world shooting and results would be between the two lens? I can read the technical differences, but how do the differences translate into real world photos?
    Thanks in advance for your input and help.

    Jim
     

  2. GDN

    GDN Active Member

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    South Island, NZ
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    A little Canon stuff
    I own neither lens, but I have used the f1.8 model. The only thing that really stood for me was it's basic construction. No distance scale, depth of field scale, and a plastic lens mount. Other than that I was pretty happy with it on an asp-c camera. It's nice and light, and pretty easy on the pocket.

    Just as an idea, have you looked at the Sigma art 50 f1.4, or the Tamron 50 F1.8 as other options?

    Gary
     
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  3. Robert Shears

    Robert Shears Active Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2017
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    Equipment:
    Pentax K-5, K-r, K20D, K100D Super.
    Canon G5, Canon 450D, Eos 100, 500, 600, T70 and T90
    Konica Minolta 7D
    Various OEM and 3rd party lenses in Pentax, Minolta and Canon.
    I suggest you consider whether the attributes you want from the lens can be provided by your choice. If you are looking for a lens that will spend most of the time around F8 then the standard 50mm F1.8 is a cheap but good lens.
    If you want wide apertures, bokeh, special rendering etc then look to the more exotic lenses.
    A 50mm macro lens might also be an option, I have a 50mm F2.5 that is the equal of my 50mm F1.8 or even better for images other than macro, the macro being a bonus if not the best focal length for a macro lens.
     
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  4. Craig Sherriff

    Craig Sherriff Active Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Tasmania, Australia
    Equipment:
    60D, 10D, 50D 1dmark3, T70, AV1, lenses ranging from 28mm to 600 mm, canonet Junior, Canonet QL 25, Mamiya C3 and 3 lens sets, Pentax MG and various lenses
    Jim, I have and use the 50mm F1.8, this was my first serious one I used when I got into using manual settings. You said that you wished to use it for general photography. The 50mm f1.2 is a more specialist portrait lens and hence the cost.
    The 50mm F1.4 is a more up market and will cost a fair bit more, it's use is similar to the 50mm F1.8 but has a better low light capability and better depth of field
    Now for the 50mm F1.8, this is dirt cheap compared to the others and has some very nice low light capability, there is one drawback that is it is cheap in it construction and if you drop it it will explode into a thousand pieces, so be gentle with it. Please correct me if I am wrong but I take it you use Auto and Aperture priority most of the time. This lens will work excellently for these setting and quite nicely in manual.
    Typical of modern lenses, there is no depth of field scale. Go onto the internet and type in depth of field master. This will give you a window where you type in your camera, lens size, aperture setting and the near and far distance for the distance you type in.
    My suggestion is get a small notebook and write in this info about the lens and distances. comes in handy if depth of field becomes a must know but if you just use auto there is no need to know this but if you become a bit adventurous, this could come in handy or a Mobil phone ap. all the best with it, Craig S.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2019
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  5. johnsey

    johnsey Site Moderator Staff Member Site Supporter

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    Fargo, ND
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    5dMk4, 5dMk2, 20D, 70-200 2.8L IS, 100mm 2.8 Macro USM, 50mm 1.4, 85mm 1.8, 17-40mm 4.0L, Rokinon 14mm 2.8; Pixma Pro-100
    If you plan to shoot close to wide open I would spend the extra 175 on the 1.4. I bought the 1.8 originally and found it to be a little soft at the widest apertures, I upgraded to the 1.4 and it is built better has the USM motor and has little better bokeh as well. To me the lens is a portrait lens by nature so the $175 upgrade was a no-brainer when the lens will be shot wide most of the time. The 1.2 is a much harder sell to me even with weather sealing and really soft bokeh, being well over a grand more but maybe if my 1.4 dies I will consider it someday.
     
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  6. JRS950

    JRS950 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2019
    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    On the road full time in the USA
    Equipment:
    EOS Rebel T6S
    EF-S 18-135; EF-S 55-250
    Speedlite 470EX-AI
    Thank you all for your help and support. Like many of the members here, I am retired and do not have unlimited finds available. From what I am reading and reading between the lines, I think I will try to save until I can afford the f1.4 lens. In the meantime I will check out the 3rd party lens available in the same features.
    Again, thank you for your insight.

    Jim
     
  7. Craig Sherriff

    Craig Sherriff Active Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Location:
    Tasmania, Australia
    Equipment:
    60D, 10D, 50D 1dmark3, T70, AV1, lenses ranging from 28mm to 600 mm, canonet Junior, Canonet QL 25, Mamiya C3 and 3 lens sets, Pentax MG and various lenses
    Jim, there is another way to go, that is cheaper and that is a M42 mount lens and a cheap adapter.
    I have been using them for years and the quality is impressive.
    Drawback is you need to take time to manual focus and use Aperture priority or manual.
    A good example can be had at ebay, opportunity shops or garage sales.
    I also suggest that you try a 135mm lens, can be very cheap . As a walk around lens they are great.
     
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  8. JRS950

    JRS950 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2019
    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    On the road full time in the USA
    Equipment:
    EOS Rebel T6S
    EF-S 18-135; EF-S 55-250
    Speedlite 470EX-AI
    Ok, update. I had planned to wait until I saved the money to buy the f1.4 50mm, but yesterday I found a like new 50mm f1.8 used for sale. Well, it now resides on my camera and I can't wait to practice with it.
    Again, thanks to all who offered information and suggestions. At some point in time I may add the f1.4, but for now I am okay.
     

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