Shooting in the dark

Discussion in 'Beginner Questions' started by Pete.c, Oct 24, 2018.

  1. Pete.c

    Pete.c New Member

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    Hi all,

    As an absolute novice I am trying to gain experience of all aspects of photography. Yep this is wrong I suppose. Should concentrate at getting one thing right before I move to the next, but that's just me I suppose.
    The thing is I am having a little play around with a few pictures at night. I have looked around the internet to get a few ideas and the settings in manual to use as a beginner I know there are no settings that are a hard and fast rule, depends on a lot of factors. And the answer appears to be shutter speed 0f 10 secs and ISO 1600, I have tried these and yes the pictures are better than I took previously, but they are noisy and not too clear have you any suggestions on this matter.


    Thanks, Pete.
     

  2. johnsey

    johnsey Site Moderator Staff Member Site Supporter

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    Hi Pete,

    I'm not too sure what the scene you were exposing should have been shot at, but I am willing to guess that you were still under exposing the scene. You would likely see a little noise at 1600, but under exposure would make it look worse. Not sure what you mean by unclear as well, i assume you are using a tripod so that should mean that the is no blur do to camera shake. Depending on how dark it is, likely you may have trouble getting focus, it may be easier to focus manually when it is that dark.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2018
  3. GDN

    GDN Active Member

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    Hi Pete,

    Any chance of posting of couple of images, this would help. Also, could you let us know how you go about getting your shots. It is different to shooting in daylight. What shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and what lens would also be helpful. You shooting jpeg's or RAW?

    Gary
     
  4. Pete.c

    Pete.c New Member

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    Canon EOS 4000D
    Hi Gary,

    No images I'm afraid, they were all deleted as they were not that good that's the polite way of putting it. I was shooting in jpeg.
    shutter speed 0f 10 secs and ISO 1600. The lens was a kit lens for my canon eos 4000d. I've not purchased any other lenses as yet as I've just got into the photography scene, I'm debating at the moment if I should get a extra wide angle lens or something.

    Thanks pete.
     
  5. johnsey

    johnsey Site Moderator Staff Member Site Supporter

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    HI Pete,

    I am curious were you using the cameras meter suggestion to identify the 10sec shutter?

    It would help quite a bit to see an example or two and trouble shoot what your results are.
     
  6. GDN

    GDN Active Member

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    No worries, if you post an image, and it does not have a work of art, we can give you a few helping pointers.

    Gary
     
  7. Pete.c

    Pete.c New Member

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    Hi,
    I will attempt to get a few photos of my dismal attempts. The settings I have got are from the internet, so they are bound to be wrong.
    I will get back to you A.S.A.P

    Thank you, peter
     
  8. johnsey

    johnsey Site Moderator Staff Member Site Supporter

    Joined:
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    Looking forward to it Peter. Sounds like your just plugging in some suggestions and they aren't matching up for an exposure, which really isn't a surprise (is the exposure meter all the way to the left in the view finder?). I think a good point to start would be with what the meter says for exposing the scene. So pick a subject and focus. Then set the aperture (lets pick f8 for example as it will let a fair amount of the scene be in focus. Then adjust your shutter until it says its not under or over exposed (the tick mark is in the middle on the exposure meter in the viewfinder). You can adjust to over or under expose from there to get desired effects.
    Forgive me if I made this too much of beginners guide.
     

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